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Hope Library Guides

Open Access: Open Access Publishers & Journals

A Guide to Open Access. What is it ? Why is it important ?

Open Access Journals: Green, Gold & Hybrid

There are many types of Open Access journals, Green, Gold, and Hybid being the most frequent types. Green open access policies give authors permission to self-archive in some way, usually in an institutional repository.  Gold journals provide immediate access to articles but the author or author's institution pays a fee at time of publication.

Hybrid journals are closed-access journals (journals which require subscriptions for access) that allow authors to pay fees to make their articles immediately open access. Publishers do not decrease subscription fees, however, even if author fees paid for an entire issue. this "double-dipping" gives publishers an additional revenue stream, yet subscription prices continue to rise. Hope's OA Fund cannot be used to pay author fees for a closed-access journal.

In response to the research community's expressed desire for OA, journal publishers continue to update their policies, with over 80% allowing some form of self-archiving (green OA).

(Harnad, S., T. Brody, F. Vallieres, L. Carr, S. Hitchcock, Y. Gingras, C. Oppenheim, C. Hajjem, and E. Hilf. "The Access/Impact Problem and the Green and Gold Roads to Open Access: An Update." Serials Review 34.1 (2008): 36-40. Web.)

 

Gold Journals

SHERPA / ROMEO

 

SHERPA / ROMEO is a database of permissions that are normally given as part of each publisher's copyright transfer agreement.  Your can search by journal title or by publisher to determine what a publisher will allow under their standard agreement.  A faculty adopted open access policy should specify what level of archiving is acceptable. 

ROMEO colour Archiving policy
green can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
blue can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) or publisher's version/PDF
yellow can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
white archiving not formally supported

 

Publisher copyright policies & self-archiving

Evaluating Open Access Journals

When selecting a high-quality open access journal for your research, a good rule of thumb is to make sure that any journal you select is indexed in DOAJ (Directory of Open Access Journals). Additional evaluation tools are listed below: